Atlanta Music Teacher Launches Novel And Major Motion Picture Franchise With Hollywood Film Producer

Atlanta resident Dr. Warren Woodruff has inked a multi-level development/production deal for his Dr. Fuddle LLC's project, Dr. Fuddle and the Gold Baton, with film producer/literary manager Dr. Ken Atchity. Woodruff is a long-time music instructor whose passion for classical music led to the conception of the story, which follows the adventures of five youths led by the mystical Dr. Fuddle into the land of Orphea to retrieve the Gold Baton from the dark musician Jedermann using it for cacophony and chaos, and restore its rightful function of bringing harmony to the universe. The franchise will include a series of novels, picture books, live action films, an interactive website, music, an educational TV series, and a line of elementary books, merchandising, toys with unique patented scientific technology "making sound visible," in addition to the book itself.

In cooperation with Atchity Productions in Los Angeles, Dr. Fuddle will soon go before the cameras as a major live action/CGI motion picture in the tradition of The Chronicles of Narnia and Oz the Great and Powerful, based on Dr. Woodruff's screenplay Dr. Fuddle and the Gold Baton. Atchity Production films include Joe Somebody, Life or Something Like It, The Kennedy Detail, The Lost Valentine and Hysteria, with others in development. Dr. Woodruff's first novel is available as an e-book and paperback at Amazon.com and in hard and soft copies through www.drfuddle.com. A consortium of Atlanta financiers provided the initial seed money, and have hired a renowned international film financing broker to close the financing for the first major motion picture. The project was brought to Atchity by Atlanta's Mardeene Mitchell, who has worked with Woodruff on the original development of the project. She introduced them at her Write the World in Atlanta conference in June of 2010.

"My goal is to inspire a new generation to the wonders of classical music through an exciting fantasy adventure ALL young people can relate to," says Woodruff, who received his Ph.D. in Musicology/Piano from the University of Miami School of Music. "The story has elements of The Wizard of Oz," Atchity states, "Harry Potter and C.S. Lewis' Narnia. But its foundation in the myth and history of music makes it truly original and inspiring."

Reposted from /PRNewswire/ 


How to Make Music With Your Eyes

This brain hat helps the paralyzed make music


Ever since musician Eduardo Miranda met a patient with locked in syndrome 11 years ago, he has been on a mission to create a way for the paralyzed to make music.

His latest invention is the brain computer music interface (BCMI) which allows people to create music using just their eyes.

How it works

By connecting electrodes to the back of the head, the system can tell where you're looking by monitoring brain activity. Flashing icons representing different snippets of music appear on screen and you can make a selection, just by staring at one.

In real time, a musician plays a score generated from the user's selections.

"Our brain is producing electricity all the time," says Miranda, head of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research at Plymouth University.

"These are very faint electrical signals but we can amplify and analyze them. Let's say you have two icons on the computer screen: one flashing at 10 hertz and the other flashing at 15 hertz. If you look at the one flashing at 15 hertz, we can detect it."

"We can detect up to eight different frequencies at the moment," explains Eduardo Miranda who is helped by a team of doctoral students and research assistants at his lab.

"My latest composition is for a string quartet. It's an interaction between eight people, four of them generating music and the others playing the music as its being generated.

"The score for the quartet is a computer monitor rather than sheet music so the musicians have to be quite skilled and perform the piece as it's generated."

 Motivation

Speaking of his inspiration for the project, Miranda says: "I wanted to create something to enable people with severe disabilities to make music. I was struck by an encounter I had once with a man who had had a stroke and was paralyzed completely from the neck down.

"That had a profound impact on me and I thought, as a musician, how I could provide a voice for him -- that's where this research began."

He adds: "A few years ago I tested a prototype with a paralyzed patient in a hospital in London he was able to play music by looking as these icons. The nurses and carers there told me that one of the things that these patients really miss is interaction with other people, not with machines. That's how this system was created."







Reposted from CNN.com


OMG Moments in Classical Music


What are the greatest moments in classical music history? The bits that make you immediately rewind and play them again? Simply, the most surprising, shocking, beautiful or weird bits in classical music? Here are 10 moments that will make you say 'OMG'…


The top C in Allegri's Miserere 

There you are, just chilling out with a bit of 17th century choral music like any self-respecting person would do, and then all of a sudden, BAM! High C! Emotional overload! Skip straight to it by pressing play below…



The climax of Beethoven's 9th Symphony Everyone sing along! 

"Freude, schöner Götterfunken, Tochter aus Elysium!" This is such a fist-pumping moment. How fist-pumping? Well, it's supposed to encapsulate the joy of humanity, of being alive, Germanic might, the brotherhood of man and basically all worldly positivity, which is a pretty tall order. Does Beethoven manage it? Take a listen… (the answer's 'yes', by the way.)



The opening chords of Elgar's Cello Concerto, played by Jacqueline Du Pré 

Few pieces are so iconic that they can be defined by a few chords alone, and few musicians are so iconic that they can be defined by one piece. In a word, 'whoompf'.




The Tristan Chord

How can one chord redefine the way we think about music? Well, it's simple. All Wagner did when he plonked this gorgeous little progression into the opening of his opera Tristan und Isolde was use an augmented fourth, an augmented sixth and an augmented ninth above the root to imply a completely different harmonic relation. Easy, yeah? Oh, just listen to it…






Don Giovanni is dragged to hell 

Much of Mozart's Don Giovanni is actually quite humorous, with amorous japes and farce aplenty, but things take an incredibly sinister turn right at the end when the Don himself (think of him as a folkloric version of Russell Brand with comparable dress-sense) is finally forced to atone for his sins. There's a slow knock at the door, Giovanni opens it and is confronted with a stone statue of the Commendatore, who drags the screaming Don into the fiery netherworld. Yikes!



See More at Classic Fm.com


Beethoven's Heart Problems May Have Played Out In His Music

























Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), German composer. One of the most famous classical music composers, Beethoven's work represents a bridge between Classical and Romantic styles.

Many who listen to Beethoven's masterpieces would describe them as deeply heartfelt -- and according to new research, this description may be surprisingly apt.

The unusual rhythms found in some of Beethoven's most iconic works may be linked to the heart condition cardiac arrhythmia, which he is suspected to have had, research from the University of Michigan and University of Washington suggests.

In a new paper published in the journal Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, the researchers -- a cardiologist, a medical historian and a musicologist -- investigated the link between the German composer's likely heart condition and his music.

"We started thinking about the ways that somebody's physical illnesses and physical body could manifest in the music they were making," one of the study's co-authors, Dr. Joel Howell, a medical historian and professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, told The Huffington Post.

The researchers examined the rhythmic patterns of a number of Beethoven's compositions for clues of this condition, and indeed found that the rhythms of certain sections of his famous works reflect the irregular rhythms of cardiac arrhythmia.

“When your heart beats irregularly from heart disease, it does so in some predictable patterns," Howell said in a written statement. "We think we hear some of those same patterns in his music.”

Cardiac arrhythmia can cause the heart to beat too slow, too fast or with an irregular beat. The researchers found that unexpected changes of pace and keys -- such as the intense final movement “Cavatina” in Beethoven’s String Quartet in B-flat Major, Opus 130 -- appeared to match these patterns. Arrhythmic patterns were also detected in iconic pieces like the Piano Sonata in A-flat major, Opus 110.

Historians and physicians have substantial inferential evidence to suggest that Beethoven suffered from heart disease, in addition to a host of other maladies, including irritable bowel syndrome and syphilis. Many of the maladies Beethoven was known to suffer from have been found to contribute to an irregular heartbeat, Howell explained.

According to the paper's authors, Beethoven's deafness could have made him even more sensitive to the rhythm of his own heartbeat, which is perhaps why it was so influential for his music.

But Beethoven isn't the only famous artist who may have had a medical condition that deeply affected his work. Claude Monet experienced vision problems and was diagnosed with cataracts in the later years of his life. Around the age of 65, he began experiencing changes in his perception of color -- and at this time, his paintings shifted towards muddier colors. After he was diagnosed with cataracts at age 72, Monet's work became noticeably more abstract.

"The synergy between our minds and our bodies shapes how we experience the world," Howell said in the statement. "This is especially apparent in the world of arts and music, which reflects so much of people's innermost experiences."

Reposted from The Huffington Post

What Ancient Greek Music Sounded Like


Between 750 BC and 400 BC, the Ancient Greeks composed songs meant to be accompanied by the lyre, reed-pipes, and various percussion instruments. More than 2,000 years later, modern scholars have finally figured out how to reconstruct and perform these songs with (it’s claimed) 100% accuracy.

Writing on the BBC web site, Armand D’Angour,  a musician and tutor in classics at Oxford University, notes:

[Ancient Greek] instruments are known from descriptions, paintings and archaeological remains, which allow us to establish the timbres and range of pitches they produced.

And now, new revelations about ancient Greek music have emerged from a few dozen ancient documents inscribed with a vocal notation devised around 450 BC, consisting of alphabetic letters and signs placed above the vowels of the Greek words.

The Greeks had worked out the mathematical ratios of musical intervals – an octave is 2:1, a fifth 3:2, a fourth 4:3, and so on.

The notation gives an accurate indication of relative pitch.

So what did Greek music sound like? Below you can listen to David Creese, a classicist from the University of Newcastle, playing “an ancient Greek song taken from stone inscriptions constructed on an eight-string ‘canon’ (a zither-like instrument) with movable bridges. “The tune is credited to Seikilos,” says Archaeology Magazine.


Hear a Reconstruction That is ‘100% Accurate’